HENkaku Ensō bootloader hack for Vita

ensō When we (molecule) were reverse engineering the Vita’s firmware years ago, one of the first vulnerabilities we found was in the bootloader. It was a particularly attractive vulnerability because it was early in boot (before ASLR and some other security features are properly initialized) and because it allowed patching the kernel before it booted (which expands what can be done with hacks). Unfortunately, the exploit required writing to the MBR of the internal storage, which requires kernel privileges. That means we would have to exploit the kernel (à la HENkaku) in order to install the exploit. (Before you ask, no it is not possible to install with a hardware mod because each Vita encrypts its NAND with a unique key. Also, there are no testpoints for the NAND, so flashing it is notoriously difficult… not as simple as the 3DS.) So, we mostly forgot about this vulnerability until quite recently when we finally all had some free time and decided to exploit it.

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Modem Cloning for Fun (but NOT for profit!)

Recently, I stumbled upon an old cable modem sitting next to the dumpster. An neighbor just moved out and they threw away boxes of old junk. I was excited because the modem is much better than the one I currently use and has fancy features like built in 5GHz WiFi and DOCSIS 3.0 support. When I called my Internet service provider to activate it though, they told me that the modem was tied to another account likely because the neighbors did not deactivate the device before throwing it away. The technician doesn’t have access to their account so I would have to either wait for it to be inactive or somehow find them and somehow convince them to help me set up the modem they threw away.

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psvimgtools: Decrypt Vita Backups

The Vita’s Content Manager allows you to backup and restore games, saves, and system settings. These backups are encrypted (but not signed!) using a key derived in the F00D processor. While researching into F00D, xyz and Proxima stumbled upon a neat trick (proposed originally by plutoo) that lets you obtain this secret key and that has inspired me to write a set of tools to manipulate CMA backups. The upshot is that with these tools, you can modify backups for any Vita system including 3.63 and likely all future firmware. This does not mean you can run homebrew, but does enable certain tricks like disabling the PSTV whitelist or swapping X/O buttons.

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State of the Vita 2016

Although it hasn’t been a good year for all of us, 2016 was a great year for the Vita. In August, molecule released the first user-friendly Vita hack which builds on four years of research and a year of building a SDK platform from scratch. Since then, we saw dozens of homebrews, new hackers showing up in the scene, and the creation of a community that I am proud to be a part of. In November, I released taiHEN, a CFW framework that makes it easy to extend the system and to port future hacks. As such, it was a busy year for molecule. We are a team of five individuals and we served as pen testers, exploit writers, web developers, UI designers, web masters, IT, moderators, PR, recruiters, software architects, firmware developers, support, and lawyers for the Vita hacking community. These are roles we took out of necessity because Vita hacking is such a niche interest. However, these are not roles we can hold forever. Back in November, I said that I (and I am assuming the rest of molecule but I do not speak for them) would retire from the scene after taiHENkaku was stable enough and that time has finally come. Aside from a parting gift from Davee that should be released in a couple of days we will be retiring from all non-research tasks. Since we entered the scene with no drama, no bullshit, and no corruption, we will leave in the same manner. Firstly, all our work are either already open sourced or are in the process of being tidied up and released. Second, we have extensively documented all our findings on the Vita with the exception of our TrustZone (lv1) hacks which we left out at the request of other hackers who wish to try the challenge without aid. Lastly, we revamped the process for setting up development and making homebrew is easier than ever. Fixing the toolchain required a lot of boring and tedious work and I want to thank everyone who helped with the process. I am proud that our toolchain is the only unofficial toolchain that was designed rather than hacked together.

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Designing taiHEN: A CFW Framework

I take software design very seriously. I believe that the architecture side of software is a far more difficult problem than the implementation side. As I’ve touch upon in my last post, console hackers are usually very bad at writing good code. The code that runs with hacks are usually ill performing and unstable leading to diminished battery life and worse performance. In creating taiHEN, I wanted to do most of the hard work in writing custom firmwares: patching code, loading plugins, managing multiple hooks from different sources so hackers can focus on reverse engineering and adding functionality.

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