Foobar, Blossoms, and Isomorphism

A friend recently invited me to participate in Foobar, Google’s recruiting tool that lets you solve interesting (and sometimes not-so-interesting) programming problems. This particular problem, titled “Distract the Guards” was very fun to solve but I found no good write-ups about it online! Solutions exist but it is rather hard to understand how the author came upon the solution. I thought I might take a shot and go into detail into how I approached it–as well as give proofs of correctness as needed.

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psvsd: Custom Vita microSD card adapter

One thing I love about Vita hacking is the depth of it. After investing so much time reverse engineering the software and hardware, you think you would run out of things to hack. Each loose end leads to another month long project. This all started in the development of HENkaku Ensō. We wanted an easy way to print debug statements early in boot. UART was a good candidate because the device initialization is very simple and the protocol is standard. The Vita SoC (likely called Kermit internally as we’ll see later on) has seven UART ports. However, it is unlikely they are all hooked up on a retail console. After digging through the kernel code, I found that bbmc.skprx, the 3G modem driver contain references to UART. After a trusty FCC search, it turns out that the Vita’s 3G modem uses a mini-PCIe connector but with a custom pin layout and a custom form factor. The datasheet gives some useful description for each pin, and UART_KERMIT seemed like the most likely candidate (there’s also UART_SYSCON which is connected to the SCEI chip on the bottom of the board, which serves as a system controller and a UART_EXT which is not hooked up on the Vita side). So finding a debug output port was a success, but with the datasheet in front of me, the USB port caught my attention. Wouldn’t it be neat to put in a custom USB device?

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Modem Cloning for Fun (but NOT for profit!)

Recently, I stumbled upon an old cable modem sitting next to the dumpster. An neighbor just moved out and they threw away boxes of old junk. I was excited because the modem is much better than the one I currently use and has fancy features like built in 5GHz WiFi and DOCSIS 3.0 support. When I called my Internet service provider to activate it though, they told me that the modem was tied to another account likely because the neighbors did not deactivate the device before throwing it away. The technician doesn’t have access to their account so I would have to either wait for it to be inactive or somehow find them and somehow convince them to help me set up the modem they threw away.

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psvimgtools: Decrypt Vita Backups

The Vita’s Content Manager allows you to backup and restore games, saves, and system settings. These backups are encrypted (but not signed!) using a key derived in the F00D processor. While researching into F00D, xyz and Proxima stumbled upon a neat trick (proposed originally by plutoo) that lets you obtain this secret key and that has inspired me to write a set of tools to manipulate CMA backups. The upshot is that with these tools, you can modify backups for any Vita system including 3.63 and likely all future firmware. This does not mean you can run homebrew, but does enable certain tricks like disabling the PSTV whitelist or swapping X/O buttons.

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State of the Vita 2016

Although it hasn’t been a good year for all of us, 2016 was a great year for the Vita. In August, molecule released the first user-friendly Vita hack which builds on four years of research and a year of building a SDK platform from scratch. Since then, we saw dozens of homebrews, new hackers showing up in the scene, and the creation of a community that I am proud to be a part of. In November, I released taiHEN, a CFW framework that makes it easy to extend the system and to port future hacks. As such, it was a busy year for molecule. We are a team of five individuals and we served as pen testers, exploit writers, web developers, UI designers, web masters, IT, moderators, PR, recruiters, software architects, firmware developers, support, and lawyers for the Vita hacking community. These are roles we took out of necessity because Vita hacking is such a niche interest. However, these are not roles we can hold forever. Back in November, I said that I (and I am assuming the rest of molecule but I do not speak for them) would retire from the scene after taiHENkaku was stable enough and that time has finally come. Aside from a parting gift from Davee that should be released in a couple of days we will be retiring from all non-research tasks. Since we entered the scene with no drama, no bullshit, and no corruption, we will leave in the same manner. Firstly, all our work are either already open sourced or are in the process of being tidied up and released. Second, we have extensively documented all our findings on the Vita with the exception of our TrustZone (lv1) hacks which we left out at the request of other hackers who wish to try the challenge without aid. Lastly, we revamped the process for setting up development and making homebrew is easier than ever. Fixing the toolchain required a lot of boring and tedious work and I want to thank everyone who helped with the process. I am proud that our toolchain is the only unofficial toolchain that was designed rather than hacked together.

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