Dumping the Vita NAND

When we last left off, I had spent an excess of 100 hours (I’m not exaggerating since that entire time I was working, I listened to This American Life and went through over a hundred one-hour episodes) soldering and tinkering with the Vita logic board to try to dump the eMMC. I said I was going to buy a eMMC socket from taobao (the socket would have let me clamp a eMMC chip down while pins stick out, allowing the pressure to create a connection) however, I found out that all the sellers of the eMMC socket from taobao don’t ship to the USA and American retailers sell the sockets for $300 (cheapest I could find). So I took another approach. Continue reading

libVitaMTP & OpenCMA: Vita content management on Linux (and more)

More than a year ago, I’ve analyzed how the Vita communicates with the computer. I mentioned at the end that I started a project that will be an open source implementation of the protocol that the Vita uses. This protocol is just MTP (media transfer protocol) with some additional commands that I had to figure out. MTP is used by most Windows supported media players and cameras, so I was able to use a lot of existing code from libmtp and gphoto2. After lots of on and off work, I am happy to announce the first (beta) version of libVitaMTP and OpenCMA. Continue reading

Playstation Vita’s USB MTP Connection Analyzed

This is the first of (hopefully) many posts on the PS Vita. Before I attempt anything drastic with the device, such as getting unsigned code to run, I hope I can try something easy (well, easier) to get used to the device. Ultimately, I want to make a content manager for the PS Vita for Linux. Unlike the PSP, the Vita does not export the memory card as a USB storage device, but instead relies on their custom application to copy content to and from the device. This post will give just a peek into how the communication between the Vita and the PC works. Continue reading

Installing Windows 8 Developer Preview (8102) on a USB Drive (Windows To Go/Portable Workspace)

This really isn’t some technical or hard to do thing, but it’s a cool little trick I found that I haven’t seen mentioned before. If you don’t know what “Windows To Go” (previously “Portable Workspace”), watch this video from the Build 2011 conference. Basically, it allows you to install a full copy of Windows 8 onto a USB drive/external hard drive and use it on any computer that supports USB booting. Your settings, files, programs, etc go where-ever you go. The feature is in Windows 8 (and the developer preview), but the program to make the drive is not. Luckily, an old leaked build has the program, but you can’t just copy and paste it, it won’t run. Instead, follow the directions below to get Windows 8 installed to a USB drive. (I used a virtual machine to do the following, therefore I did not need to burn any DVDs. I will give the directions assuming you’re using a real computer though). Continue reading