Kindle 3.2.1 Jailbreak (Update)

When I first released the Kindle 3.2.1 jailbreak, I called it “temporary.” Although confusing to use and set up, it has gotten thousands of hits and reports of success. However, it was “temporary” because the method used depended on some precise timing and I had a better method that I was saving for Kindle 3.3. Now, I realize that 3.3 will never come, but will instead be 4.0 that will come with Kindle 4, and with a new hardware, everything doesn’t matter. Serge A. Levin has independently discovered a similar bug for what I was going to use on the 3.3 jailbreak, and I’ve asked him to release it because he deserves the credit for the work. If we’re lucky, Amazon will fix the bug in a way that my similar plan for 3.3/4.0 will still work. Continue reading

Kindle 3.X updater for Kindle 2 and Kindle DX released

After a month and a half of testing thanks to the community of MobileRead, I can finally release the first stable version of the Kindle 3.X software updater (help me come up with a better name, please). If you haven’t read my last few Kindle-related posts (read them if you want more technical details of this script), you should know that this allows you to use all the cool new features of the Kindle 3 on a K2 or DX device. Installation is easy and is only three steps: 1) Use “prepare-kindle” script on old Kindle to back up and flash recovery kernel, 2) Copy generated files to Kindle 3 along with “create-updater” script and run it, 3) Copy generated update package back to old Kindle and restart. If that sounds confusing, don’t worry, the readme contains very detailed directions and even how to recover in case anything goes wrong. Speaking of recovery, a “side effect” of using this is that the custom kernel that you flash in order to run the update package allows recovering without a serial cable and the installation of unsigned recovery packages. Continue reading

Porting Kindle 3.1: Part 2 – Update encryption

Overview

So, on the topic of Kindle (I swear, it’s becoming an obsession). I am currently in the process of porting the Kindle 3.1 software to Kindle 2 and DX. I will make a series of posts describing my process while describing how various parts of the Kindle operating system works. Now I’ve tested 3.1 on my Kindle 2 and it works perfectly fine. All features work (audio, TTS, book reading), and the new features also work without major slowdowns (new PDF reader, new browser, etc).

Where’s part one you ask? Well, part one was getting the 3.1 OS to work on the Kindle 2, the rest is making an easy installer. That is a long story that involves custom partition tables, manually creating tar files (checksums are a pain), remote debugging, and more. It’s a lot of stuff and most aren’t very useful because nobody should have to repeat the process, which is why I’m creating a easy to use installer. If I have time one day, I may write it down for documentation purposes. Continue reading

Recovering a formatted or corrupt Kindle 2

One day, while playing around with a Kindle 2, I accidentally deleted the /lib folder. Oops. Now, no command beyond “ls” and “rm” work. If this was a computer, I could have simply inserted a installation DVD and copied the files over, but this was an eBook reader, and I was in for a world of pain. This was a month ago, and I’ve finally recovered the Kindle. I’m posting what I did online to save anyone else who’s in the same boat a ton of time. This tutorial is only designed for the Kindle 2, but it MAY work for the DX. It will NOT work for the Kindle 3, but directions should be similar. Continue reading