Credits to egarrote from for the logo!

Rejuvenate: Native homebrew for PSVita

(Sadly, they did not give me a spot at the Sony E3 conference, so I have to make do with this blog post.) I am excited to announce Rejuvenate, a native homebrew platform for PS Vita. The tools that will be released through the next couple of weeks will allow developers (not in contract with Sony) to develop and test games, apps, and more on the PS Vita. These unofficial software can run on any PS Vita handheld device without approval by Sony. These tools cannot enable pirated or backup games to run (I’m not just saying this… the exploits used does not have enough privilege to enable such tasks). Rejuvenate requires PlayStation Mobile Development Assistant to be installed on your Vita! Sony will remove this from PSN soon, so if you wish to ever run homebrew apps on your PS Vita, you must download this app now!

Continue reading

Calling all coders: We need you to help create an open Vita SDK!

One of largest barrier to native PS Vita homebrew is the lack of an open toolchain and SDK. Essentially, we need something like pspsdk for the Vita. The reason why we don’t have it is because there are people who have an understanding of how the Vita’s executable format works but lack the time to code up the tools and there are people who have the time and ability to create such tools but lack the knowledge of Vita’s internals. The solution, I believe is to publish a comprehensive document detailing how the Vita’s executable format is laid out and the requirements for an open toolchain. Anyone with coding skills can now work on an open SDK; no Vita knowledge required! Continue reading

Unlocking T-Mobile 4G Hotspot (ZTE MF61): A case study

So, I have one of these MiFi clone from T-Mobile and want to unlock it to use on AT&T (I know that AT&T 4G/3G isn’t supported, but I thought maybe I could fix that later). The first thing I tried to do was contact T-Mobile, as they are usually very liberal concerning unlock codes. However, this time, T-Mobile (or, as they claim, the manufacture) isn’t so generous. So I’ve decided to take it upon myself to do it. I will write down the entire procedure here as a case study on how to “reverse engineer” a new device. However, in no way do I consider myself an expert, so feel free to bash me in the comments on what I did wrong. Also, I have decided against releasing any binaries or patches because phone unlocking is a grey area (although it is legal here), but if you read along you should be able to repeat what I did, even though I will also try to generalize. Continue reading