libVitaMTP & OpenCMA: Vita content management on Linux (and more)

More than a year ago, I’ve analyzed how the Vita communicates with the computer. I mentioned at the end that I started a project that will be an open source implementation of the protocol that the Vita uses. This protocol is just MTP (media transfer protocol) with some additional commands that I had to figure out. MTP is used by most Windows supported media players and cameras, so I was able to use a lot of existing code from libmtp and gphoto2. After lots of on and off work, I am happy to announce the first (beta) version of libVitaMTP and OpenCMA. Continue reading

Huawei E587 (T-Mobile 4G Sonic Hotspot): Information and rooting

Earlier this year, I got my hands on the T-Mobile 4G Sonic Hotspot and as always, had to tear it apart as soon as I got it. I never wrote about it because I didn’t find anything overly interesting, but now it’s the end of the year, and I need to clear some inventory from my brain. If anyone remembers my post on the (older) T-Mobile 4G Hotspot (sans “Sonic”), the main limitation of that device was that the processor is an obscure one that required some digging to get information on. Thankfully, the Sonic variety is much easier to break into. Continue reading

Playstation Vita’s USB MTP Connection Analyzed

This is the first of (hopefully) many posts on the PS Vita. Before I attempt anything drastic with the device, such as getting unsigned code to run, I hope I can try something easy (well, easier) to get used to the device. Ultimately, I want to make a content manager for the PS Vita for Linux. Unlike the PSP, the Vita does not export the memory card as a USB storage device, but instead relies on their custom application to copy content to and from the device. This post will give just a peek into how the communication between the Vita and the PC works. Continue reading

One more thing: custom recovery kernel for Kindle 3

I didn’t plan to do any more Kindle stuff for a while, but when I made a recovery kernel (prevents your Kindle from bricking) for the Kindle 2/DX as part of my 3.X installer, many asked for a similar protective thing on newer Kindles. Well, here it is.

For now it’s just a kernel with recovery features (export entire filesystem without password or serial port and install custom recovery packages), but maybe if I have the time, one day, I will make it a full custom kernel with additional features or something.

Kindle 3.2.1 Jailbreak

UPDATE: Serge A. Levin has kindly modified my “temporary” jailbreak into a more permanent solution. The information below is now considered old and should be disregarded. Link to jailbreak for all devices on all versions.

 

So I never intended to release a jailbreak for Kindle 3.2.1 because 1) people who got a discount for their Kindles should stick by their commitment and keep the ads and 2) this was an update made purely to disable jailbreaks, so there are no new features. However, from what I heard, more and more people are receiving 3.2.1 as stock firmware (not just ad-supported Kindles) and that people who exchanged their broken Kindles also have 3.2.1. I don’t want to reveal the exploit I found yet (I’m saving it for the next big update), but thankfully, after half an hour of digging, I’ve found another glitch that I can use. The bad news is that this isn’t an “easy one click” jailbreak, it will actually take some effort as some precise timing needs to be correct in order to work. Continue reading

Recovering a formatted or corrupt Kindle 2

One day, while playing around with a Kindle 2, I accidentally deleted the /lib folder. Oops. Now, no command beyond “ls” and “rm” work. If this was a computer, I could have simply inserted a installation DVD and copied the files over, but this was an eBook reader, and I was in for a world of pain. This was a month ago, and I’ve finally recovered the Kindle. I’m posting what I did online to save anyone else who’s in the same boat a ton of time. This tutorial is only designed for the Kindle 2, but it MAY work for the DX. It will NOT work for the Kindle 3, but directions should be similar. Continue reading

Compiling the Linux kernel for Amazon Kindle

So, I recently bought a Kindle 2. As usual, the minute it arrived, I ripped it apart, poked every chip, and then started to reverse engineer the damn thing. Wait. I didn’t have to! I found this out days late, after messing with IDA Pro. Amazon has generously released most of the back end code for the Kindle as open source. (The front end, aka the stuff you see, is written in Java and we might get to that another day). So I decided to compile my own Kindle kernel. Why? Why not. Here’s how:

Part 1: Prerequisites

  • Get a root shell of your Kindle. If you don’t know, Google “usbNetworking”
  • A Linux computer for compiling code
  • Amazon’s sources for your version of the Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200203720
  • An ARM cross-compiler. You can compile Amazon’s code, or if you’re lazy, use CodeSourcery’s precompiled toolchain: http://www.codesourcery.com/sgpp/lite/arm
  • The following packages, get them from your distro’s repo: libncurses-dev (for menuconfig), uboot-mkimage (for making the kernel image), and module-init-tools (depmod)

Part 2: Compiling the kernel

  1. Extract the source to anywhere. If you can’t decide, use “~/src/kernel/” and “cd” to the source files.
  2. Now, you need to configure for the Kindle, type “make mario_mx_defconfig
  3. Edit the “.config” file and look for the line that starts with “CONFIG_INITRAMFS_SOURCE“. We don’t need that, delete that line or comment (#) it out.
  4. Here’s the part were you make all your modifications to the kernel. You might want to do “make menuconfig” and add extra drivers/modules. I’ll wait while you do that.
  5. Back? Let’s do the actual compiling. Type the following: “make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=~/CodeSourcery/Sourcery_G++_Lite/bin/arm-none-linux-gnueabi- uImage”. This will make the kernel image. I assume you installed CodeSourcery’s cross compiler to your home folder (default). If your cross compiler is elsewhere, change the command to match it.
  6. Compile the modules into a compressed TAR archive (for easy moving to the kindle): “make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=~/CodeSourcery/Sourcery_G++_Lite/bin/arm-none-linux-gnueabi- targz-pkg” (again, if your cross compiler is installed to a different location, change it).
  7. For some reason, depmod refuses to run with the compile script, so we’re going to do it manually. Do the following “depmod -ae -F System.map -b tar-install -r 2.6.22.19-lab126 -n > modules.dep” Change 2.6.22.19-lab126 to your compiled kernel version.
  8. Open modules.dep up with a text editor and do a search & replace. Replace all instances of “kernel/” with “/lib/modules/2.6.22.19-lab126/kernel/” (again, use your version string). I’m not sure this is needed, but better safe then brick.
  9. Now copy arch/arm/boot/uImage, linux-2.6.22.19-lab126.tar.gz (or whatever your version is), and modules.dep to an easy to access location.

Part 3: Installing on Kindle

  1. Connect the Kindle to your computer, and open up the storage device. Copy the three files you moved from the previous part to your Kindle via USB.
  2. This part is mostly commands, so get a root shell to your Kindle, and do the following commands line by line. Again, anywhere the version string “2.6.22.19-lab126” is used, change it to your kernel’s version. Explanation follows.

mv /mnt/us/linux-2.6.22.19-lab126.tar.gz /mnt/us/modules.dep /mnt/us/uImage /tmp

mv /lib/modules /lib/modules.old

cd /tmp & tar xvzf /tmp/linux-2.6.22.19-lab126.tar.gz

mv lib/modules /lib/

chmod 644 modules.dep

mv modules.dep /lib/modules/2.6.22.19-lab126/

/test/flashtools/update-kernel-both uImage

sync

shutdown -r now

Wow, that’s a lot of commands. What did that do? Well, line by line:

  1. Move the files we compiled to the temp folder. That way, we don’t have to clean up.
  2. Back up the old kernel modules
  3. Go to the temp folder and untar the modules
  4. Install the modules
  5. Correct the permissions for the modules.dep file (in case something happened after copying from your computer)
  6. Move the module dependencies list to it’s correct folder.
  7. Flash the kernel (I don’t know why it has to be flashed twice to two different partitions, but if you don’t, it won’t load, maybe sig checks?)
  8. Make sure everything is finished writing
  9. Reboot