PlayStation Vita: the progress and the plan

Sorry that it’s been a while since I’ve said anything about the Vita. I was caught by surprise the last time of all the media attention from just a simple call for help. While I still don’t want to say too much right now, I do want to answer some common questions I’ve been getting and also go over what needs to be done.

If this is news to you, please read this interview I’ve done a while ago about it.

Did you hack the Vita? That’s a very vague question. What I have done, is run native code on the Vita with the same permissions as the game being exploited. This means I can load homebrews written and optimized for the Vita’s CPU and take full advantage of the CPU speed and RAM (unlike the PSP emulator or PSM, both impose artificial limits on resources and system functions). What has NOT been done (yet) is unlocking the system completely for tasks like USB interfacing, custom themes/system mods/plugins, and (fortunately) pirating games.

What’s UVLoader and how far along is it? The last I’ve spoken, I was beginning work on UVL and asked for any help I could get. Even though, I did not really get help, I did find people who were interested in what I was doing and we exchanged information. I also want to brag that I finished the main functionalities of UVL in a couple of weeks, and it has been “done” for about three months now. (Quotes around “done” because I decided to not worry about some features yet). That means, I can basically load most (most being the few that I manually built without an open sdk) compiled homebrews. You can run your standard hello worlds and spinning cubes and such, but in theory, it should load any homebrew built.

When’s the release? What’s taking so long? So as I’ve said, the loader was done three months ago. I have a couple of reasons for not releasing yet. The main reason is that currently, there is no open SDK for compiling and linking Vita homebrew like pspsdk did for the PSP. That means, even with the loader, it would be useless for users because there are no homebrew games, emulators, etc to run, and it would be useless for developers because they can’t build homebrews either. So what’s the progress on the open sdk? Zero, as I’m typing this right now. I have an idea of what it should look like and I spoke to a couple of people who are interested in helping, but so far, no code is written. Why is that? Because for me, I am very busy with lots of other unrelated things, and unfortunately, only me and a handful of other people know enough about the device and the executable format and etc to make the open sdk and none of us have the time currently.

The second reason is that having a Vita exploit at this stage (when it is really hard to find exploits) is very rare if not a once in a lifetime thing. Me and others I’ve talked to agree that right now it’s more important to use this exploit to gather more information about the system in order to find more exploits and such than it is to run homebrews right now. We have PSM for homebrew games and PSP emulator for homebrew emulators, so there really isn’t a huge demand for native PSVita homebrews yet. As I’ll expand on below, we’ve only scratched the surface of Vita hacking and there’s so much more to see.

Are you looking for testers/can I test UVLoader? There’s no need to “test” UVLoader right now because, as I’ve stated before, there isn’t any compiled homebrew and nothing to compile them anyways. Yes, UVL works with some of the custom still I’ve built manually, but it is unwise to write complex stuff without a working SDK.

Can help? Depends who you are. If you’re an established reverse engineer, you know how to contact me. If you just want to “beta test,” read above. If you know any other way of helping me, don’t ask, just do it™, since UVL is open source. Even though I don’t accept monetary donations before I release anything, if you have access to broken Vitas, memory cards, games, etc, or any unused hardware reversing tools like logic analyzers; anything you wouldn’t mind parting with, one of the things me and others involved don’t have access to is funds for materials to test some of the more… risky ideas and if you could help with that respect, just use the contact link at the top of the page to get in touch with me.

What needs to be done to “hack” the Vita? Again, that term is very vague, but I know what you mean. This is the perfect time to describe (as far as I know) the Vita’s security structure and what needs to be done at each level.

PSP emulator

I’ll start with the PSP emulator just because that is what’s “hacked” right now. How much control do you have of the Vita when you use vHBL? Almost none. On the PSP itself, games are “sandboxed” (meaning some other process tells it what functions of the PSP can be used by the current game, main thing being that one game can’t load another game). Because the Vita emulates the PSP, it also emulates this structure.

PSP kernel

One level up, we have “kernel exploits” on the PSP, which means that we are no longer limited to what functions of the PSP we can use. Any PSP function that is emulated by the Vita can be used, that’s why you see ISO loading as the main thing. However, all of this, the PSP emulator, sits in the Vita game sandbox. This sandbox is just like the PSP one, in that another Vita process tells the game (in this case, the PSP emulator running some PSP game) what Vita functions can be used in a similar fashion. For example, if a game doesn’t explicitly declare that it’s going to use the camera or bluetooth (and Sony approves), any code that tries to use these functions will crash.

Vita userland

This is where UVLoader works; we exploited some game to run code inside it’s sandbox, meaning that if that game doesn’t have camera functions, no UVLoader Vita homebrew can use the camera either. This also means, of course, we can’t load pirated Vita games and so on. A fun fact here is that, in theory, if someone finds an exploit in Kermit, the system inside the PSP emulator that talks to the Vita through a virtual serial port, they can run UVLoader in the process hosting the emulator (one level higher than a PSP kernel exploit), meaning they may be able to modify the emulator to have more RAM or faster CPU or etc. Another advantage of running UVLoader here is that because the PSP emulator has access to more Vita hardware than most games (bluetooth, camera, etc), homebrews could have more access too.

However, it’s easier said than done. It’s hard to appreciate  how hard it is to get a Vita userland exploit. Let’s work backwards: we want to somehow run native ARM code, how? Well, the classic route is some stack smash. But wait, modern ARM processors have XN (eXecute Never), which is a feature that only allow code in memory to run at specific locations (these locations are determined by the kernel and are read only). Ok, we have some other choices here: heap overflows, ROP (google if you don’t know), and so on (assuming you even know you got a working exploit, which in itself is hard to know without additional information; most “crashes” are useless), but all of these choices require that you know enough about the system to create a payload fitted for the system. That means, you need either a memory sniffer or somehow dump the memory. Well, let’s rule out hardware memory sniffing since the Vita has the RAM on the same system-on-a-chip as the CPU. How do we dump the memory then? Usually, you need to run some code to dump the memory or do some kind of oracle attack on crashes or error messages or something. Option one only works if we hacked the system before, and the second one, AFAIK, won’t work because the Vita doesn’t give any information when it crashes. So how did I get the first userland exploit? I’ll leave that as an exercise to the reader…

Vita kernel (lv2?)

Vita userland is the most we have access right now and PSP kernel mode is the most that is public. What comes after? Remember all information at this point could be wrong and is based off of the little evidence I have currently. We are in the Vita sandbox right now, which means we can run homebrew, but we can’t use functions that the game doesn’t use (camera, bluetooth, USB, etc). We also can’t modify the system (run Linux, change the theme, add plugins, etc). For those to work, we need to go one level up: the Vita kernel, which might be called lv2. Even with complete userland access, we can’t even poke at the kernel. The kernel acts like a black box, providing functions to the system through syscalls. You pass input into these syscalls and it returns some output, without revealing how the output is created. The kernel’s memory is separate from userland obviously, and even guessing what syscalls do (there’s no names in the memory, only numbers) is a challenge. In order to hack the kernel, we have a problem that is very much like the one I’ve stated above about getting Vita userland, except with even more limitations. Again, there’s the circular problem of needing a kernel RAM dump to inspect for exploits and requiring a kernel exploit to dump the RAM. Now, there’s even less “places” to inspect (visually and programmatically). In order of likelihood, one of the following needs to happen before there’s even a CHANCE of a kernel exploit: 1) Sony does something stupid like the PS3 keys leak, 2) we get REALLY lucky and basically stumble upon an exploit by just testing one of the several hundreds of syscalls with one of an infinite amount of different inputs, 3) some information leaks out from Sony HQ.

It’s still unknown how much control we would have if kernel mode is compromised, but me and some others think that we MAY at least be able to do something like a homebrew enabler (HEN) that patches signature checks temporarily until reboot, allowing for homebrews with no sandbox limitations (access to camera, BT, etc) and POSSIBILITY system plugins and themes. It is very unlikely at any keys will be found at this point or being able to create or run a CFW.

Hypervisor? (lv1?)

At this point, it is purely a thought experiment, as we literally have no information beyond what we THINK the kernel does. It is highly possible that there is a hypervisor that makes sure everything running is signed and the kernel isn’t acting up and such. Getting to this would be EVEN HARDER than getting kernel, which I already think is impossible. Even at kernel, it seems to be over my skill limit, but this would definitely be above me, and someone with real skills would have to attack this. I’m thinking at least, decaps will have to be attempted here. If somehow this gets hacked, we may be able to run CFWs, but like the PS3 before the lv0, newer firmwares would not be able to be CFW’d until…

Bootloader? (lv0?)

Again, only conjecture at this point, but this is the holy grail, the final boss. Once this is compromised, the Vita would be “hacked” in every sense of the word. We may never get here (and by never, I mean maybe 5-10 years, but I would most likely not be working on the Vita at this point). Here’s is where I think the keys are stored. With this compromised, CFW of any past, present, or future firmwares could be created, and anything would be possible.

Summary

I guess to summarize, the reason there’s no release in the foreseeable future isn’t just because I don’t have time to make an sdk so there won’t be homebrews to use even if UVL is released. Even if the SDK does get done, at this point, it would be more attractive to use the control we currently have, double down, and try to get more control. If the exploit is revealed prematurely, getting the game pulled, and the firmware patched, sure we may get a fast N64 emulator in a couple of months when somebody has the chance to write it (and at that point, most people might be enticed to upgrade anyways for new firmware features and PSN access), but we will have to start at square one (read above about finding userland exploits) before having another chance at exploring the full potential of the system. Deep down, I am a researcher, and would have more interest in reversing the system than I would at making a release for users just so I could be the “first”. Like all gambles, I may end up with nothing, but that’s a risk I’m willing to take.

One more thing: custom recovery kernel for Kindle 3

I didn’t plan to do any more Kindle stuff for a while, but when I made a recovery kernel (prevents your Kindle from bricking) for the Kindle 2/DX as part of my 3.X installer, many asked for a similar protective thing on newer Kindles. Well, here it is.

For now it’s just a kernel with recovery features (export entire filesystem without password or serial port and install custom recovery packages), but maybe if I have the time, one day, I will make it a full custom kernel with additional features or something.

Kindle 3.X updater for Kindle 2 and Kindle DX released

After a month and a half of testing thanks to the community of MobileRead, I can finally release the first stable version of the Kindle 3.X software updater (help me come up with a better name, please). If you haven’t read my last few Kindle-related posts (read them if you want more technical details of this script), you should know that this allows you to use all the cool new features of the Kindle 3 on a K2 or DX device. Installation is easy and is only three steps: 1) Use “prepare-kindle” script on old Kindle to back up and flash recovery kernel, 2) Copy generated files to Kindle 3 along with “create-updater” script and run it, 3) Copy generated update package back to old Kindle and restart. If that sounds confusing, don’t worry, the readme contains very detailed directions and even how to recover in case anything goes wrong. Speaking of recovery, a “side effect” of using this is that the custom kernel that you flash in order to run the update package allows recovering without a serial cable and the installation of unsigned recovery packages.

Here it is.

Oh, and in case anyone is wondering why I’m not just distributing a full 3.X update package and making you generate it by yourself, it’s because the Kindle framework and OS are proprietary code. I believe that Amazon didn’t release 3.0 for the DX and K2 because they don’t want to lose business for the Kindle 3. So, by making you have a Kindle 3 in order to use this, I can keep Amazon happy.

Recovering a formatted or corrupt Kindle 2

One day, while playing around with a Kindle 2, I accidentally deleted the /lib folder. Oops. Now, no command beyond “ls” and “rm” work. If this was a computer, I could have simply inserted a installation DVD and copied the files over, but this was an eBook reader, and I was in for a world of pain. This was a month ago, and I’ve finally recovered the Kindle. I’m posting what I did online to save anyone else who’s in the same boat a ton of time. This tutorial is only designed for the Kindle 2, but it MAY work for the DX. It will NOT work for the Kindle 3, but directions should be similar.

 

First

If you’ve think you “bricked” your Kindle, don’t panic yet. There could be a easy solution. Chances are, if you can see the startup progress bar loading, the solution should be easier (although I can’t tell you exactly what your problem is). I would follow Amazon’s troubleshooting directions first. Only proceed if you are absolutely sure nothing else can be done.

Overview

Here’s what you’ll need

  1. TTL to RS232 or USB connector. I used this one. For that, use the jumper on pin 1 and 2 on the side (with the three pins, pin 1 is towards the USB port). Connect Kindle Tx -> Tx, Rx -> Rx, GND -> GND, VDD -> VDD
  2. Windows with HyperTerminal (I tried Kermit on Linux, but it couldn’t send files. HyperTerminal is the only program I’ve tested that works sending files to the Kindle)
  3. Linux or Unix-based computer with “dd” and “ssh”
  4. My custom recovery kernel which allows jailbreak signed recovery packages and exporting MMC0 without a password. If you want to know how I’ve made it in technical details, see the appendix.

Here’s what we’ll be doing:

  1. Attaching the recovery port
  2. Flashing the custom patched recovery kernel
  3. Obtaining a backup of Kindle system files
  4. Restoring your Kindle

Attaching the recovery port

First open up the Kindle 2 to reveal the PCB board. You should remove both the metal casing and the white plastic with all the screws. On the top, to the left of the headphone jack, you should see four pads labeled J4. Either solder (recommended) or tape (make sure it isn’t lose!) four wires to these pads. The order of these ports (left to right, where left is towards the volume switch) are: VDD, Rx, Tx, GND. Connect these lines to your TTL adapter and connect the adapter to your computer.

Flashing the custom patched recovery kernel

Open up HyperTerminal, and connect to your adapter. Make sure to click “Configure” and fill in the settings. The settings are: BPS: 115200, Data bits: 8, Parity: none, Stop bits: 1, Flow control: none. Then, restart your Kindle either by removing & reconnecting the battery, holding the sleep switch for 30 seconds, or tapping the reset switch on the PCB. Press Enter when text pops up in HyperTerminal. You only have one second, so be quick. In uBook, type in “run prg_kernel_serial” (make sure to type fast or uBoot will timeout). Then right click on the text, and choose “Send File”. Under protocol, choose Ymodem-G and for the file, select my custom kernel. Wait a few minutes for it to upload and install, then type in “bootm 0xa0060000″ to boot the kernel. The Kindle has two kernels that it alternates on each boot, so if you want to use my recovery kernel, you need to either flash the other kernel also or type in “bootm 0xa0060000″ into uboot on startup. Hold down Enter either on your computer or on the Kindle to enter the recovery menu. The recovery menu times out in 10 seconds, so you need to be quick. First type “I” to recreate all the partitions, then type “3″ to export the MMC. Again, these can be typed from either your keyboard in HyperTerminal, or the Kindle keypad. If you do not have access to HyperTerminal because you are in Linux restoring, you can get back here by holding Enter on the Kindle keypad and pressing 3 on the recovery menu.

Obtaining a backup of Kindle system files

Let’s put your broken Kindle aside. You need a working copy of Kindle’s system files. I cannot provide this for legal reasons, but if you obtain another Kindle 2 (preferably the same model and version as your broken one, but others MAY work [not Kindle 3 though... yet]), jailbreak it and install the usbNetwork hack for SSH access. Make sure that Kindle has at least 500MB of free space on the FAT partition to store the backup image. Once you SSH’d into the working Kindle (there are tons of tutorials around on this), issue the following command:

dd if=/dev/mmcblk0p1 of=/mnt/us/rootfs.img bs=1024

Note that this will only make a copy of the OS files. All personal information, passwords, books, etc are not copied. You can tell your friend that. This may take five to fifteen minutes to run, but when the command returns with the blocks written, you can disable usbNetwork and enable USB storage again. Copy the rootfs.img file over to your recovery computer and prepare to restore.

Restoring your Kindle

Back to your broken Kindle. You need to reformat the root and copy over the backup files. I moved the Kindle over to a Linux computer because it is easier. You can also use OSX or maybe even cygwin, but I haven’t tested. In shell, type in the following commands:

sudo su # Become root, so you don’t need to sudo everything

fdisk -l # Look for your Kindle’s identifier, it should be something like /dev/sdc, it should be a 2GB drive with 4 partitions. I will use /dev/sdX to represent this drive

mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdX2 # Make a ext3 partition for /var/local

dd if=/path/to/rootfs.img of=/dev/sdX1 bs=1MiB # This will take a long time to finish

Note that an alternative method is to gzip rootfs.img and place it into a recovery package created using kindle_update_tool.py, but I’ll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

Appendix

So, what is in the magical Kindle recovery kernel? It’s actually just a regular Kindle kernel recompiled with a modified initramfs with a patched recovery script. Using the regular kernel, you’ll run into two difficulties when trying to recover. First, if you press 3 to export MMC0, you’ll get a password prompt. Good luck brute forcing it. Second, if you build a custom recovery package using kindle_update_tool.py m –k2 –sign –fb, it will not work because of signature checks. What I did was patch the two checks.

First, I extracted the recovery-utils file by gunzipping uImage (with the extra stuff stripped out), and gunzipped initramfs.cpio from that. Then I extracted initramfs.cpio and found recovery-utils under /bin.

Next, the easy part is patching the updater package signature checks. What I did is extract the updater RSA public key file from the Kindle, found under /etc/uks and used OpenSSL to extract the public key from it (n and e). Then I opened recovery-utils with a hex editor, searched for the public key, and replaced it with the jailbreak key (found in kindle_update_tool.py).

Finally, the challenging part was to patch the password check from export MMC0. First I opened recovery-utils with IDA Pro. Then I located the check_pass function. I worked backwards from that and saw it was called from loc_94A8. Here’s a snippet of the check along with my interpretation of what it does:

BL check_pass # Call the check_pass function

CMP R0, #0 # check_pass sets register R0 with the return value, we will check if R0 equals 0×0

BEQ loc_9604 # If the previous instruction is true, then password check has failed

LDR R0, =aDevMmcblk0 ; “/dev/mmcblk0″ # We did not jump out, so CMP R0, #0 is false

BL storage_export # Call this function

It’s always easy to patch the least amount of instructions with the least amount of changes, so this is what I did. (Note that IDA Pro doesn’t allow editing instructions directly, so I have to find the machine code in hex to know what to replace. Luckily, I have tons to instructions to look at and see what their corresponding machine codes are).

NOP # Instead of calling check_pass, I did MOV R0, R0 which is the same as NOP

CMN R0, R0 # Negative compare R0 with itself. Basically, always return false.

… rest is the same

Now, I saved the file and luckily, it was the same size. So I didn’t have to recreate the initramfs.cpio, I just replaced the file inside with my hex editor (note that cpio files do not have checksum checks unlike tar files). I copied this to the kernel source folder and compiled the kernel. Lucky for you, I have already done all of this so you don’t have to.

Compiling the Linux kernel for Amazon Kindle

So, I recently bought a Kindle 2. As usual, the minute it arrived, I ripped it apart, poked every chip, and then started to reverse engineer the damn thing. Wait. I didn’t have to! I found this out days late, after messing with IDA Pro. Amazon has generously released most of the back end code for the Kindle as open source. (The front end, aka the stuff you see, is written in Java and we might get to that another day). So I decided to compile my own Kindle kernel. Why? Why not. Here’s how:

Part 1: Prerequisites

  • Get a root shell of your Kindle. If you don’t know, Google “usbNetworking”
  • A Linux computer for compiling code
  • Amazon’s sources for your version of the Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200203720
  • An ARM cross-compiler. You can compile Amazon’s code, or if you’re lazy, use CodeSourcery’s precompiled toolchain: http://www.codesourcery.com/sgpp/lite/arm
  • The following packages, get them from your distro’s repo: libncurses-dev (for menuconfig), uboot-mkimage (for making the kernel image), and module-init-tools (depmod)

Part 2: Compiling the kernel

  1. Extract the source to anywhere. If you can’t decide, use “~/src/kernel/” and “cd” to the source files.
  2. Now, you need to configure for the Kindle, type “make mario_mx_defconfig
  3. Edit the “.config” file and look for the line that starts with “CONFIG_INITRAMFS_SOURCE“. We don’t need that, delete that line or comment (#) it out.
  4. Here’s the part were you make all your modifications to the kernel. You might want to do “make menuconfig” and add extra drivers/modules. I’ll wait while you do that.
  5. Back? Let’s do the actual compiling. Type the following: “make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=~/CodeSourcery/Sourcery_G++_Lite/bin/arm-none-linux-gnueabi- uImage”. This will make the kernel image. I assume you installed CodeSourcery’s cross compiler to your home folder (default). If your cross compiler is elsewhere, change the command to match it.
  6. Compile the modules into a compressed TAR archive (for easy moving to the kindle): “make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=~/CodeSourcery/Sourcery_G++_Lite/bin/arm-none-linux-gnueabi- targz-pkg” (again, if your cross compiler is installed to a different location, change it).
  7. For some reason, depmod refuses to run with the compile script, so we’re going to do it manually. Do the following “depmod -ae -F System.map -b tar-install -r 2.6.22.19-lab126 -n > modules.dep” Change 2.6.22.19-lab126 to your compiled kernel version.
  8. Open modules.dep up with a text editor and do a search & replace. Replace all instances of “kernel/” with “/lib/modules/2.6.22.19-lab126/kernel/” (again, use your version string). I’m not sure this is needed, but better safe then brick.
  9. Now copy arch/arm/boot/uImage, linux-2.6.22.19-lab126.tar.gz (or whatever your version is), and modules.dep to an easy to access location.

Part 3: Installing on Kindle

  1. Connect the Kindle to your computer, and open up the storage device. Copy the three files you moved from the previous part to your Kindle via USB.
  2. This part is mostly commands, so get a root shell to your Kindle, and do the following commands line by line. Again, anywhere the version string “2.6.22.19-lab126” is used, change it to your kernel’s version. Explanation follows.

mv /mnt/us/linux-2.6.22.19-lab126.tar.gz /mnt/us/modules.dep /mnt/us/uImage /tmp

mv /lib/modules /lib/modules.old

cd /tmp & tar xvzf /tmp/linux-2.6.22.19-lab126.tar.gz

mv lib/modules /lib/

chmod 644 modules.dep

mv modules.dep /lib/modules/2.6.22.19-lab126/

/test/flashtools/update-kernel-both uImage

sync

shutdown -r now

Wow, that’s a lot of commands. What did that do? Well, line by line:

  1. Move the files we compiled to the temp folder. That way, we don’t have to clean up.
  2. Back up the old kernel modules
  3. Go to the temp folder and untar the modules
  4. Install the modules
  5. Correct the permissions for the modules.dep file (in case something happened after copying from your computer)
  6. Move the module dependencies list to it’s correct folder.
  7. Flash the kernel (I don’t know why it has to be flashed twice to two different partitions, but if you don’t, it won’t load, maybe sig checks?)
  8. Make sure everything is finished writing
  9. Reboot