Reversing Gateway Ultra Stage 3: Owning ARM9 Kernel

First, some background: the 3DS has two main processors. Last time, I went over how Gateway Ultra exploited the ARM11 processor. However, most of the interesting (from a security perspective) functionalities are handled by a separate ARM946 processor. The ARM9 processor is in charge of the initial system bootup, some system services, and most importantly all the cryptographic functions such as encryption/decryption and signature/verification. In this post, we will look at how to run (privileged) code on the ARM9 processor with privileged access to the ARM11 processor. Please note that this writeup is a work in progress as I have not completely figured out how the exploit works (only the main parts of it). Specifically there are a couple of things that I do not know if it is done for the sake of the exploit or if it is done purely for stability or obfuscation. From a developer’s perspective, it doesn’t matter because as long as you perform all the steps, you will achieve code execution. But from a hacker’s perspective, the information is not complete unless all aspects are known and understood. I am posting this now as-is because I do not know when I’ll have time to work on the 3DS again. However, when I do, I will update the post and hopefully clear up all confusion. Continue reading

Reversing Gateway Ultra Stage 2: Owning ARM11 Kernel

It’s been a couple of days since my initial analysis of Gateway Ultra, released last week to enable piracy on 3DS. I spent most of this time catching up on the internals of the 3DS. I can’t thank the maintainers of 3dbrew enough (especially yellows8, the master of 3DS reversing) for the amount of detailed and technical knowledge found on the wiki. The first stage was a warmup and did not require any specific 3DS knowledge to reverse. The problem with the second stage is that while it is easy to see the exploit triggered and code to run, the actual exploit itself was not as clear. I looked at all the function calls made and made a couple of hypothesis of where the vulnerability resided, and reversed each function to the end to test my hypothesis. Although there was many dead ends and false leads, the process of reversing all these functions solidified my understanding of the system. Continue reading

Why hacking the Vita is hard (or: a history of first hacks)

It’s been about a year since I revealed the first userland Vita exploit and I still occasionally get messages asking “what happened” (not much) or “when can I play my downloaded games” (hopefully never) or “I want homebrew” (me too). While I don’t have anything new exploitwise (same problems as before: no open SDK, lack of interest in the development community, lack of time on my part), I do want to take the time and go over why it’s taking so long. Continue reading

Kindle 3.2.1 Jailbreak (Update)

When I first released the Kindle 3.2.1 jailbreak, I called it “temporary.” Although confusing to use and set up, it has gotten thousands of hits and reports of success. However, it was “temporary” because the method used depended on some precise timing and I had a better method that I was saving for Kindle 3.3. Now, I realize that 3.3 will never come, but will instead be 4.0 that will come with Kindle 4, and with a new hardware, everything doesn’t matter. Serge A. Levin has independently discovered a similar bug for what I was going to use on the 3.3 jailbreak, and I’ve asked him to release it because he deserves the credit for the work. If we’re lucky, Amazon will fix the bug in a way that my similar plan for 3.3/4.0 will still work. Continue reading

Kindle 3.2.1 Jailbreak

UPDATE: Serge A. Levin has kindly modified my “temporary” jailbreak into a more permanent solution. The information below is now considered old and should be disregarded. Link to jailbreak for all devices on all versions.

 

So I never intended to release a jailbreak for Kindle 3.2.1 because 1) people who got a discount for their Kindles should stick by their commitment and keep the ads and 2) this was an update made purely to disable jailbreaks, so there are no new features. However, from what I heard, more and more people are receiving 3.2.1 as stock firmware (not just ad-supported Kindles) and that people who exchanged their broken Kindles also have 3.2.1. I don’t want to reveal the exploit I found yet (I’m saving it for the next big update), but thankfully, after half an hour of digging, I’ve found another glitch that I can use. The bad news is that this isn’t an “easy one click” jailbreak, it will actually take some effort as some precise timing needs to be correct in order to work. Continue reading

Kindle 3.1 Jailbreak

I was bored one weekend and decided to jailbreak the new Kindle firmware. It was time consuming to find bugs, but not difficult. Unlike the iPhone, the Kindle doesn’t really have security. They have a verified FS and signed updates and that’s it, but I will still call my jailbreak an “exploit” just to piss you off. Previous Kindle 3 jailbreaks worked (AFAIK, I haven’t really looked into it) by tricking the Kindle into running a custom script by redirecting a signed script using a syslink. This worked because the updater scans only “files” that do not end with “.sig” (signature files to validate the file). They fixed this now by scanning all non-directorys that do no end with “.sig”. This is the first bug I’ve exploited. Part one is getting the files into the update, which I did by conventionally renaming them to “.sig” even though they’re not signature files. Part two is harder, getting the unsigned script to run. Continue reading